Windows Server 2008 R2 HyperV vs Windows Server 2012

Comparison of Hyper-V on Windows Server 2012 and Server 2008

Hyper-V in Windows Server 2008 R2 supported configuring virtual machines with a maximum of four virtual processors and up to 64 GB of memory. However, IT organizations increasingly want to use virtualization when they deploy mission-critical, tier-1 business applications. Large, demanding workloads such as online transaction processing (OLTP) databases and online transaction analysis (OLTA) solutionstypically run on systems with 16 or more processors and demand large amounts of memory. For this class of workloads, more virtual processors and larger amounts of virtual machine memory are a core requirement.

Hyper-V in Windows Server 2012 greatly expands support for host processors and memory. New features include support for up to 64 virtual processors and 1TB of memory for Hyper-V guests, a new VHDX virtual hard disk format with larger disk capacity of up to 64 TB, and additional resiliency. These features help ensure that the virtualization infrastructure can support the configuration of large, high-performance virtual machines to support workloads that might need to scale up significantly.  These however, aren’t the only improvements in Windows Server 2012 Hyper-V, as you can see from the table below.

Table comparing Windows Server 2012 Hyper-V and Windows Server 2008 r2 Hyper-V:

 
Resource
Windows Server 2008 R2 Hyper-V
Windows Server 2012 Hyper-V
Improvement Factor
Host
Logical Processorss
64
320
 
Physical Memory
1TB
4TB
 
Virtual CPUs per Host
512
2,048
VM
Virtual CPUs per VM
4
64
16×
 
Memory per VM
64GB
1TB
16×
 
Active VMs per Host
384
1,024
2.7×
 
Guest NUMA
No
Yes
-
Cluster
Maximum Nodes
16
64
 
Maximum VMs
1,000
8,000

Significant improvements have been made across the board, with Hyper-V now supporting increased cluster sizes, a significantly higher number of active virtual machines per host, and additionally, more advanced performance features such as in-guest Non-Uniform Memory Access (NUMA). This ensures customers can achieve the highest levels of scalability, performance and density for their mission-critical workloads.

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